art

asylum-art:

Maskull Lasserre: Skull Carved from Outdated Computer Books, ‘incarnate’

Maskull Lasserre was born in Alberta, Canada in 1978. He spent much of his childhood in South Africa before returning to Canada. He now works out of studios in both Montreal and Ottawa.human anatomy. twigs into spines.

Lasserre’s drawings and sculptures explore the unexpected potential of the everyday through allegories of value, expectation, and utility. Elements of nostalgia, accident, humor, and the macabre are incorporated into works that induce strangeness in the familiar, and provoke uncertainty in the expected.

Lasserre has exhibited across Canada and in the United States.

asylum-art:

 Michal Trpak sculptures 
Whether the figures are carried towards the sky or just holding on to umbrellas, sailing downward is up to the viewer to decide. ‘Slight Uncertainty’ the installation by Czech artist Michal Trpák is called and the viewer can’t be quite be sure of what is happening here. Trpák installs his sculptures almost exclusively in public places. ‘Slight Uncertainty’ for example is located in an office building in Prague. He recons that sculptures and art should be increasingly displayed in public places where many people move around, come and go. His goal is to create a dialogue between public life, the surrounding architecture and sculptures. ‘This is the dialog I am trying to get with my art, dialogue among my art, architecture and people. And if the people are talking about the installation and if it somehow affects them it means that it is good.’
 
Zoom Info
asylum-art:

 Michal Trpak sculptures 
Whether the figures are carried towards the sky or just holding on to umbrellas, sailing downward is up to the viewer to decide. ‘Slight Uncertainty’ the installation by Czech artist Michal Trpák is called and the viewer can’t be quite be sure of what is happening here. Trpák installs his sculptures almost exclusively in public places. ‘Slight Uncertainty’ for example is located in an office building in Prague. He recons that sculptures and art should be increasingly displayed in public places where many people move around, come and go. His goal is to create a dialogue between public life, the surrounding architecture and sculptures. ‘This is the dialog I am trying to get with my art, dialogue among my art, architecture and people. And if the people are talking about the installation and if it somehow affects them it means that it is good.’
 
Zoom Info
asylum-art:

 Michal Trpak sculptures 
Whether the figures are carried towards the sky or just holding on to umbrellas, sailing downward is up to the viewer to decide. ‘Slight Uncertainty’ the installation by Czech artist Michal Trpák is called and the viewer can’t be quite be sure of what is happening here. Trpák installs his sculptures almost exclusively in public places. ‘Slight Uncertainty’ for example is located in an office building in Prague. He recons that sculptures and art should be increasingly displayed in public places where many people move around, come and go. His goal is to create a dialogue between public life, the surrounding architecture and sculptures. ‘This is the dialog I am trying to get with my art, dialogue among my art, architecture and people. And if the people are talking about the installation and if it somehow affects them it means that it is good.’
 
Zoom Info
asylum-art:

 Michal Trpak sculptures 
Whether the figures are carried towards the sky or just holding on to umbrellas, sailing downward is up to the viewer to decide. ‘Slight Uncertainty’ the installation by Czech artist Michal Trpák is called and the viewer can’t be quite be sure of what is happening here. Trpák installs his sculptures almost exclusively in public places. ‘Slight Uncertainty’ for example is located in an office building in Prague. He recons that sculptures and art should be increasingly displayed in public places where many people move around, come and go. His goal is to create a dialogue between public life, the surrounding architecture and sculptures. ‘This is the dialog I am trying to get with my art, dialogue among my art, architecture and people. And if the people are talking about the installation and if it somehow affects them it means that it is good.’
 
Zoom Info
asylum-art:

 Michal Trpak sculptures 
Whether the figures are carried towards the sky or just holding on to umbrellas, sailing downward is up to the viewer to decide. ‘Slight Uncertainty’ the installation by Czech artist Michal Trpák is called and the viewer can’t be quite be sure of what is happening here. Trpák installs his sculptures almost exclusively in public places. ‘Slight Uncertainty’ for example is located in an office building in Prague. He recons that sculptures and art should be increasingly displayed in public places where many people move around, come and go. His goal is to create a dialogue between public life, the surrounding architecture and sculptures. ‘This is the dialog I am trying to get with my art, dialogue among my art, architecture and people. And if the people are talking about the installation and if it somehow affects them it means that it is good.’
 
Zoom Info

asylum-art:

 Michal Trpak sculptures

Whether the figures are carried towards the sky or just holding on to umbrellas, sailing downward is up to the viewer to decide. ‘Slight Uncertainty’ the installation by Czech artist Michal Trpák is called and the viewer can’t be quite be sure of what is happening here. Trpák installs his sculptures almost exclusively in public places. ‘Slight Uncertainty’ for example is located in an office building in Prague. He recons that sculptures and art should be increasingly displayed in public places where many people move around, come and go. His goal is to create a dialogue between public life, the surrounding architecture and sculptures. ‘This is the dialog I am trying to get with my art, dialogue among my art, architecture and people. And if the people are talking about the installation and if it somehow affects them it means that it is good.’

 

Kevin Francis Gray

Kevin Francis Gray’s 2005 body of work was so hugely appealing: London youths—the freaks and oft-romanticized street tribes of the East End—were cast as towering Rodin-like figures. These figures wore jeans, tanks, and sneakers; their faces obscured by hoodies and veils. It was urban ghetto-gothic street style immortalized in ancient materials like bronze, marble, and black resin. A once fleeting feeling was rendered permanent, mythical almost.

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